Ranger Rick, Ranger Rick Jr

Make a Fairy House

Make a small house for a fairy that's big on imagination and made with things you can find in nature.

Ranger Rick
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Average Rating:
Participant Age: Under 7, 7 to 12
Approximate Cost: $0
Duration: 1 to 60 minutes
Difficulty:
Physical Challenge:
  • Various nature objects (twigs, bark, pine cones, leaves, stones, etc.)
  • Burlap
  • Clipboard
  • Miter saw
  • Paint
  • Paint brushes
  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Rope
  • Sitting pads or chairs
  • Tablecloth or tarp
  • Thick branches
Gather objects from nature

Twigs, bark, pine cones, leaves, stones, acorns, flower petals, and many other objects make perfect building materials. You can pick flowers from your own yard, if you ask first.

To keep things organized, it helps to put all your building supplies on a tarp or tablecloth in one spot.


If you would like some round circular pieces of wood, use a saw to cut large branches

These make great tables, beds, steps or other items for your fairy house.


Pick a Place

A hidden site is usually best to keep your house safe—unless you want to put it where passers-by might spot it and smile.

Sit quietly and examine your fairy house location

You can draw possible designs for your fairy house on paper with a clipboard.


You can even build your fairy house up in a tree

We took two long sticks and tied them along a branch to provide a flat area. Then we used other twigs to made a tree house.


We made an elevator going up to our treehouse

Of course, fairies can fly, but we made an elevator to the treehouse so their non-flying friends could visit. We cut doors into milk jugs, decorated the jugs with tissue paper and glue, and then attached a rope around a nearby branch.


We painted small bits of burlap to make rugs for our fairy houses

It adds a bit of color to our fairy house.


Add fun details

Sea shells can be mailboxes or sinks. Pounded in twigs can be a fence. A big piece of bark can be a roof.


Build your fairy house or even a whole community

Twig walls? A roof of bark or one thatched with leaves? A pebble path? A pine-cone fence? The options are endless. You might even furnish your house with, say, a nutshell bathtub, acorn lanterns, or a leaf hammock.


Take a photo of your fairy house

Time and weather will take a toll on your house, so you may want to take a photo to remember it. Of course, you can always make more—anywhere you go! At the beach, driftwood, shells, and seaweed can become a sandy village. When winter comes along, snow and icicles turn into new building supplies.

Play with your fairy house

The story of fairy houses is that if you leave them out, the fairies will visit at night. But in the day time, you could play in the fairy house with your toys, if you'd like!


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