Friday's intriguing people: Dr. Doug Inkley

Inkley has spent the past week surveying the Gulf area: "The complete toll on fish and wildlife will never be fully known."

05-28-2010 // Jay Kernis

This excerpt is from a CNN.com article.

The certified wildlife biologist and senior scientist for the National Wildlife Federation says that the impact of oil spills can last a long time. Inkley has spent the past week surveying the Gulf area, specifically in Louisiana at the Mississippi River Delta.

He told USA Today, "The complete toll on fish and wildlife will never be fully known. I discovered a bottom-dwelling eel floating dead on the surface of the oil slick, but who knows how many more will die and never surface."

On the federation's website, Inkley wrote about another disaster on the minds of many people today.

"More than 20 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, oil can still be found on the beaches of Prince William Sound. Many species have still not completely recovered. Herring, an important link in the food chain and previously supporting a commercial fishing industry in the area, have shown little recovery. Wildlife still not recovered to pre-oil spill populations include goldeneyes, black oystercatchers, harlequin ducks, killer whales, sea otters, clams and mussels."

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