Water Quality Ruling a Victory for Chesapeake Bay Wildlife

"I am thrilled that the court ruled in favor of clean water, fishable rivers and safe places for children to swim."

09-13-2013 // Lacey McCormick

Crabbing in Chesapeake Bay

U.S. District Judge Sylvia Rambo of the Middle District of Pennsylvania has rendered a decision in The American Farm Bureau Federation v. Environmental Protection Agency case.

Larry Schweiger, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation, said today:

"As one of the 17 million people who live near a river or stream flowing to the Chesapeake Bay, I am thrilled that the court ruled in favor of clean water, fishable rivers and safe places for children to swim. The court made it clear the agency is authorized to continue doing what is necessary to reduce pollution entering the Chesapeake Bay and protect the water that sustains people, wildlife and livelihoods. The science-based standards create accountability and are leading to real results."

Background information:

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States. Unfortunately, Chesapeake Bay has long had serious problems with water quality that have degraded its wildlife habitats and lowered its populations of many species of fish and shellfish. In an effort to curb the pollution entering the bay, in December 2010 the Environmental Protection Agency set a pollution limit for the bay termed Total Maximum Daily Load. This standard was based on sound science and drew heavily on plans created by the six states in the Chesapeake watershed. The American Farm Bureau and others sued in order to stop the EPA from implementing this pollution limit.

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