Mobile Giving to Save Wildlife Impacted by the Oil Spill

Hawksbill Sea Turtle

The Text2Give campaign was disabled on October 31, 2010. The mobile giving campaign has been a tremendous success thanks to your incredibly generous charitable donations and undying support and concern for the welfare of affected wildlife from the oil spill.

Find out more about how the donations from this campaign help safeguard wildlife and habitats impacted by the Gulf oil disaster >>

Wildlife and wild places are facing the worst ecological disaster in U.S. history. Dolphins, manatees, countless fish species--as well as nesting birds and sea turtles--all are at risk in the Gulf due to the oil spill.

For many of these precious creatures, the threat is deadly.

Help support National Wildlife Federation's on-the-ground volunteer and restoration efforts by donating to our Gulf Oil Spill Restoration Fund.

Dolphins Jumping at Sunset

We don't know what's ahead. We do know the National Wildlife Federation will be there.

For more about how you can help, stay tuned to www.nwf.org/oilspill. You can also help threatened wildlife by sharing this page with your friends and followers.

Donate online and receive all the benefits of an NWF membership.

 

Related Resources
Volunteer: NWF Gulf Coast Surveillance Teams 

We are organizing a network of volunteers to monitor the coast for wildlife in distress. Find out more about this opportunity to volunteer and also about how you can support the effort.

NWF on the Front Lines

After the BP oil spill, NWF President Larry Schweiger headed to the Gulf Coast to assess the damage with our Louisiana staff.

Comparison: Exxon Valdez vs. BP Oil Spill

In 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spilled 10.8 million of oil into the Prince William Sound in Alaska. How will the BP Oil Spill compare?

Take Action
Help Protect Wildlife Impacted by the BP Oil Spill 

Three things you can do to help the wildlife and coastal habitat impacted by the BP Oil Spill:
 

1. Speak up for wildlife
2. Donate to save wildlife in crisis
3. Volunteer to help wildlife

Featured Story