Conservation Hall of Fame Inductees

Click on each member to learn more.

John James Audubon

John James Audubon
His paintings inspired interest in nature. His work lives on as the National Audubon Society.

Hugh Bennett

Hugh Bennett
He founded the Soil Conservation Service and built awareness of soil as a critical natural resource.

John Burroughs

John Burroughs
His two dozen books and numerous essays charmed the world, connecting science with conservation.

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson
Her book Silent Spring sparked interest in pesticides and helped start the modern environmental movement.  

Anna Botsford Comstock

Anna Botsford Comstock
Mother of nature education, she was one of the first to bring her students and other teachers out-of-doors. 

Jacques Cousteau

Jacques Cousteau
He took us underwater inspiring generations to explore our environment and study its complexity.  

Jay N. Ding Darling

Jay N. "Ding" Darling
Wildlife artist, political cartoonist, and founder of National Wildlife Federation. 

Marjory Stoneman Douglas

Marjory Stoneman Douglas
Her book, The Everglades: River of Grass, raised awareness about this unique aquatic ecosystem.

Ira Gabrielson

Ira Gabrielson
First director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, he focused on wetlands and waterfowl.

Grinnell

George Bird Grinnell

He founded the first Audubon Society and laid the foundation for national parks and forest reserves.

William Temple Hornaday

William Temple Hornaday
An early crusador for endangered species, he lead the fights to save American bison and migratory birds. 

Lady Bird Johnson

Lady Bird Johnson
Former first lady led revolutionary efforts to beautify America through national policy. 

Aldo Leopold

Aldo Leopold
Conservation pioneer and visionary game manager, he wrote about the concept of the land ethic. 

A. Starker Leopold

A. Starker Leopold
Conservation advocate, wrote a landmark set of recommendations on managing National Park visitors and resources.   

Luna Leopold

Luna Leopold
A pioneer in river studies, he had a profound influence on protecting American waterways.  

George Perkins Marsh

George Perkins Marsh
As a Congressman, he wrote in the mid- to late-1800s about man's impact on soil, water, and vegetation.   

Robert Marshall

Robert Marshall
A founder of the Wilderness Society, he would hike more than 50 miles a day through uncharted wilderness. 

Stephen Mather

Stephen Mather
Worried about Yellowstone, he created the National Park Service and doubled the size of the nation's parks.  

John Muir

John Muir
Founder of the Sierra Club, he focused the nation on a new type of progress: conservation.

O.J. Murie

O.J. Murie
He forged the Wilderness Act of 1964, now the National Wilderness Preservation System.  

Gaylord Nelson

Gaylord Nelson
Senator and profound environmental advocate, he was the father of Earth Day. 

Olmstead

Frederic Law Olmsted
Landscape architect, he designed urban parks - such as Central Park - bringing nature to the city.    

Sigurd Olson

Sigurd Olson
He often rallied diverse interests in his leadership positions for government and environmental groups.   

Roger Tory Peterson

Roger Tory Peterson
The Peterson era began in 1934 with A Field Guide to the Birds. Illustrated with Peterson drawings.

Gifford Pinchot

Gifford Pinchot
Founder of the U.S. Forest Service, he taught science- based management to the first generation of foresters. 

John Wesley Powell

John Wesley Powell
The first surveyor of the American Southwest, he developed land-use policies in the West.

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt
This President made the first wildlife refuges, set up the Forest Service and protected millions of acres.  

Ernest Thompson Seton

Ernest Thompson Seton
Inspiring both science and fiction, his art captured the exact anatomy and the romance of animals. 

Wallace Stegner

Wallace Stegner
A passionate advocate for the protection of the West, he taught with his writing such as The Wilderness Letter.  

Ernest Swift

Ernest Swift
Former executive director of the National Wildlife Federation, he shaped the first U.S. Wilderness Act.   

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau
He wrote Walden, one of the greatest masterpieces of nature writing, inspiring people to explore nature.    

Morris Udall

Morris Udall
In Congress, he championed many green laws such as the Alaska Lands Act, doubling the national park system.  

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