The National Wildlife Federation

Donate Donate

Photos of the Week: Delaware Wildlife

  • NWF Staff
  • PhotoZone
  • Mar 06, 2017

Check out some of our favorite photos from past National Wildlife photo contests. Each week we'll celebrate nature and wildlife from a different state. This week we're featuring Delaware nature and wildlife!




Wildlife photographer Charlie Long got this shot of a mosquito resting on an idle frog in a shallow pool in Delaware's Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge using a Canon 1D Mark III with a 17-135mm lens. Read National Wildlife's Ten Tips to Give Frogs a Landing Pad.




Photographer John Griggs writes, "I was amazed to find this sweat bee gathering the lovely but very short lived blue pollen on the Scottish Thistle. To me, this image has an almost 'otherworldly' feel as we get down to its world." The Pennsylvania resident made this image in Claymont, Delaware using a Nikon D200 with a 50mm f/2.8 macro lens. Read National Wildlife's Being There for Bees.




Robert Miller writes, "The light was beautiful and setting when I caught this juvenile black-crowned night-heron coming in for a landing" in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The Maryland resident used a Nikon D300 camera. Read National Wildlife's Bird of Myth and Elegance.




Nature photographer Sean Crane caught this young red fox mid-yawn in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The New York resident used a Nikon D300 with a 200-400mm lens. Read Ranger Rick's Red Foxes.




Photographer Drew Smith made this image of a blue grosbeak feeding on grass seed along the wildlife drive in Delaware's Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The Virginia resident used a Canon EOS 7D with a 500mm f/4 lens and 1.4x teleconverter. Read National Wildlife's Bird Tales with a Bite.




Photographer David Mellon "woke up early to get this shot of the marsh as the sun came up" in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. The Delaware resident used a Canon T1i camera. Read National Wildlife's The Great Marsh: Nature's Flood Insurance.




Nature photographer Jay Fleming photographed these "laughing gulls in a frenzy feeding on horseshoe crab eggs in the surf zone along Rehoboth Bay on Delaware's Dewey Beach," using a Nikon D200 with a 300mm lens.




Photographer David Mellon made this image of a Halloween pennant dragonfly at Lums Pond State Park, Delaware using a Canon T2i camera on macro-mode. Read National Wildlife's Dragonflies are Dangerous Beauties.




Authors and photographers Hal and Kirsten Snyder caught this mid-air moment between tree swallows in Delaware's Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area using a Canon EOS 1D Mark II with a 600mm lens and 1.4x teleconverter. The Delaware residents write, "Tree swallows are not only stunningly beautiful birds with their iridescent blue mantles, they are also amazing aerialists."




Landscape photographer Steve Greer made this image of horseshoe crabs in Delaware Bay using a Canon EOS 5D with a 17mm lens. He writes, "Thousands of horseshoe crabs climb out of the water to spawn in the predawn light. This ancient ritual predates dinosaurs. The timing, moon cycles, tides, sunrise, and weather, were all important elements in making this photo possible." Read National Wildlife's Shorebirds' Fate Hinges on Horseshoe Crabs.




Nature photographer Kari Post writes, "This male common yellowthroat was singing among a stand of phragmites, and I managed to capture this shot as he climbed his way up to the top of the plant. Most common yellowthroats I’ve observed stay pretty low in the brush while calling, but this individual kept moving up and down the reeds and even sang from tree branches, allowing me to get some nice clean photographs of this behavior." The New Jersey resident got this shot in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge using a Canon 1D Mark II with a 300mm f/2.8 lens. Read National Wildlife's True Colors: How Birds See the World.



Photographer Drew Smith made this image of a full moon setting behind beach grass at dawn on Delaware's Pickering Beach using a Canon EOS 7D with a 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens on a tripod. NWF Family Fun: Keep a Moon Journal.




Wildlife photographer Daniel D'Auria captured the moment "an eastern wood-pewee returning to roost from a fresh catch" in Delaware's Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge using a Canon 1DX with a 600mm f/4 lens. Read National Wildlife's Urban Biodiversity.




Nature photographer Rob Melone caught an approaching storm in Delaware's Cape Henlopen State Park using a Nikon D90 with an 18-200mm lens.




Wildlife and nature photographer Larry Hitchens was photographing a fishing green heron in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge when he was "pleasantly surprised by a painted turtle that climbed aboard the log and joined the bird." The Maryland resident used a Canon EOS 1DS Mark II with a 600mm f/4 lens.




Photographer David Nibouar spotted a juvenile blue crab with a meal in its mouth while strolling along the beach in Delaware's Cape Henlopen State Park. The Pennsylvania resident used a Nikon D80 with a 28-300mm lens.



Landscape and wildlife photographer Michael Pyle made this image of a snowy egret mid-meal in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge using an Olympus E3 with a 300mm lens. Read National Wildlife's Bird of Grace and Trauma.




Photographer Sandy Dimke was on "an outing with my family (and camera), and spotted a pickerel weed plant growing at the edge of a pond in Delaware's Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge." The South Carolina resident used a Canon EOS 40D with a 100mm macro lens.




Photographer Michael Galeone captured the moment a snowy owl left its perch in Delaware Seashore State Park using a Nikon D4 with a 400mm f/2.8 lens. Read National Wildlife's Snowy Owl Snowstorm.




Landscape and wildlife photographer Benjamin DeHaven made this photo of a curious raccoon in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge using a Nikon D90 with a 70-300mm lens. Read National Wildlife's Raccoons: A League of Their Own.




Nature photographers Hal and Kirsten Snyder write, "While hiking in Brandywine Creek State Park's deep woods, we stumbled upon an eye-level wood thrush nest that was visible from the trail. The birds didn't seem concerned with our presence." The Delaware residents were able to capture this image when sunlight bathed the nest for about 8 minutes, using a Canon EOS 1DS Mark II with a 600mm lens and 1.4x teleconverter on a tripod. Read National Wildlife's A Shakespeare Among Birds.



More from the National Wildlife Federation:

NWF Affiliate Delaware Nature Society
NWF Blogs about Delaware
National Wildlife Federation's Mid-Atlantic Regional Center
Find a Park: Delaware
Our Work: Protecting America's Waters
Delaware Eco-Schools
Nature's Witnesses: Powerful images of wilderness can inspire conservation.

Get Involved

   Please leave this field empty

Happening Near You

You don't have to travel far to join us for an event. Attend an upcoming event with one of our regional centers or affiliates.

Learn More