National Wildlife Magazine
The front cover of National Wildlife's Spring issue containing text and an image of a Columbian ground squirrel feeding on flowers.

Spring 2024 Issue

  • NWF Staff
  • National Wildlife
  • Mar 28, 2024

Columbian ground squirrels—such as this one munching on leafy aster in Glacier National Park—go nuts for all kinds of plant parts, from petals to leaves to seeds. In addition to feeding wildlife, native seeds are key to restoring landscapes ravaged by fire and extreme weather. But are there enough seeds to go around? Also in this issue: AI in wildlife research, endangered entomologists, scouting purple martin real estate and taking a glass-half-full approach in the Ohio River basin. (Photo by Donald M. Jones/Minden Pictures)

Subcribe to National Wildlife Magazine
Subcribe to National Wildlife Magazine

A Colossal Need for Native Seed

  • By Ray Levy Uyeda
  • Conservation
  • March 28, 2024

Restoring wildlife habitat on fatigued public land starts with native seed—a commodity in short supp...

Read More

Rowen White on Indigenous Seed Saving

  • By Rowen White
  • Conservation
  • March 28, 2024

Rowen White of Sierra Seeds and the Indigenous Seedkeepers Network shares lessons on seed saving for...

Read More

Are Entomologists as Endangered as the Insects They Study?

  • By Erica Goode
  • Conservation
  • March 28, 2024

All life depends on insects. As many species decline and others—including disease carriers—relocate,...

Read More

Zoonomia’s Genomics of Scale

  • By Robin Tricoles
  • Conservation
  • December 30, 2023

By sharing as many wildlife reference genomes as possible, can the Zoonomia Project provide early wa...

Read More

What’s in a Scientific Name: A Look at Wildlife Eponyms

  • By Asher Elbein
  • Conservation
  • December 30, 2023

Whose names are worthy of wildlife? From Charles Darwin to Taylor Swift, these eponyms are agitating...

Read More

Why I Hunt

  • By Kami Elsisie
  • Conservation
  • December 30, 2023

On the Navajo Nation, a latecomer to hunting learns lessons about leadership, food sovereignty and c...

Read More

Making Room for Purple Martins on Public Property

  • By Heather Valey and Delaney McPherson
  • Wildlife Photos
  • March 28, 2024

As bird populations continue to decline, volunteers are scouting new real estate for purple martins ...

Read More

Female Birds Finally Get Their Due

  • By Laura Tangley
  • Science News
  • March 28, 2024

Gender bias isn’t limited to humans. Long overlooked and understudied, female birds are receiving mo...

Read More

Wildlife Science: Urban Moths, Water Features, Spring Songbirds

  • By Mark Wexler
  • Science News
  • March 28, 2024

How moths benefit urban plants and water features boost biodiversity; spring outpaces songbirds; the...

Read More

Wildlife Winter Survival Strategies

  • By Rebecca Dzombak
  • Animals
  • December 30, 2023

As climate change scrambles winter weather, scientists find that many wildlife are using multiple su...

Read More

Humans Aren't the Only Mammals Who Go Through Menopause

  • By Erica Goode
  • Science Sleuth
  • December 30, 2023

But there aren’t many others. Studying the few known species of mammals that experience menopause mi...

Read More

Wildlife Science: Snow Hunting Owls; Is Beekeeping Bad?

  • By Mark Wexler
  • Scope
  • December 30, 2023

How great gray owls hunt beneath the snow; why beekeeping may be bad for native pollinators; the ben...

Read More

Corporate Landscaping Rolls Out the Wildlife Welcome Mat

  • By Brianna Randall
  • Habitat Gardening
  • March 28, 2024

When corporations rewild their landscaping, acres of lawn become greener, more wildlife-friendly and...

Read More

Milkweed: It Makes an Insect Village

  • By Laura Tangley // Art by Sarah Nelson
  • Habitat Gardening
  • March 28, 2024

Planting milkweed in your garden aids not only monarchs but a whole slew of pollinators and other in...

Read More

Winter Garden Checklist

  • By Amy McCullough
  • Garden for Wildlife
  • December 30, 2023

Restless growers, rejoice: Here’s how to keep busy during winter and prepare your garden for a full ...

Read More

Photographer Karine Aigner's Plan 'Bee'

  • By Jennifer Wehunt // Photo by Karine Aigner
  • Wildlife Photos
  • March 28, 2024

How photographer Karine Aigner captured her prizewinning shot of South Texas cactus bees

Read More

Birders in Living Color

  • By Jennifer Wehunt // Art by Makeba "KEEBS" Rainey
  • Conservation
  • March 28, 2024

Philadelphia artist Makeba “KEEBS” Rainey's portraits of In Color Birding Club members celebrate inc...

Read More

Visualizing Birdsong with Artist Alice Hargrave

  • By Jennifer Wehunt // Art by Alice Hargrave
  • Footprint
  • December 30, 2023

Chicagoan Alice Hargrave translates birdsong audio recordings into vibrant visual works of art to ra...

Read More

2023 National Wildlife Photo Contest Winners

  • By Jennifer Wehunt
  • PhotoZone
  • December 20, 2023

What a flock of talent! See the double-take-inducing winners of the 2023 National Wildlife Photo Con...

Read More

2023 National Wildlife Photo Contest: Honorable Mentions & People’s Choice Winners

  • NWF Staff
  • PhotoZone
  • January 24, 2024

See 64 stunning honorable mentions and People’s Choice picks from our 52nd annual photo contest

Read More

Explore More

Where We Work

More than one-third of U.S. fish and wildlife species are at risk of extinction in the coming decades. We're on the ground in seven regions across the country, collaborating with 52 state and territory affiliates to reverse the crisis and ensure wildlife thrive.

Learn More
Regional Centers and Affiliates