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PLANTS
FIRST PLACE
Donald Caffrey

Goddard, Kansas

Like a menacing halo, an arc of blue light reflects hail in the clouds of a massive storm cell sweeping across a Kansas plain. Though a native of the state, photographer Donald Caffrey had never seen a tornado, so when he heard a storm was brewing, he grabbed his camera and chased it down. Fueled by adrenaline and ignoring high winds, he captured power in motion: “This is life in the Great Plains.”


NWF PRIORITY

Conserving Alaska

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The National Wildlife Federation has a long history of encouraging wildlife and habitat conservation in Alaska. In the 1970s, NWF played a key role in promoting passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, putting more of its efforts into passage of the law than it had done previously with any other legislation. More recently, the Federation supported its former state affiliate, the Renewable Resources Coalition, on a campaign to educate the public about problems posed by the proposed Pebble Mine project, which threatens the health of the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery in the Bristol Bay watershed. For decades, NWF also has fought to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development. “Some natural treasures are simply too special to degrade,” says NWF President and CEO Collin O’Mara, noting that the refuge spans five different ecological zones. “The refuge represents the last opportunity to preserve an entire, undisturbed ecosystem that runs from mountain top to the sea within the Arctic Circle.”

Support NWF and help safeguard the future of wildlife.


THREATENED SPECIES

A vision to save wildlife in crisis

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At its 81st annual meeting in June, the National Wildlife Federation and its 51 affiliates committed to a visionary plan to not only halt the decline of U.S. wildlife populations but to actually increase those populations during the next 30 years. A wide range of species have declined in the past four decades, from freshwater mussels, fish and frogs to common birds such as Allen’s hummingbird (below) and mammals such as moose. Scientists estimate about one-third of U.S. species are at risk of extinction.


CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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CREATING HABITAT

33,000 trees planted

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More from National Wildlife magazine and the National Wildlife Federation:

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