The National Wildlife Federation

Community Profile

Pledge Status

Active

Pledge Date

Thursday, April 29, 2021

Program Year

Program Year 2021

Links and Uploads

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Action Item Report

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City of League City

League City, TX

Pat Hallisey

Mayor

Pledge Summary

League City is a waterfront community nestled along the shores of Clear Creek in Galveston County, Texas with a 2021 population of approximately 110,467. It is located in the Greater Houston Metropolitan area with close proximity to Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. League City is home to the South Shore Harbor Resort and Conference Center, Butler Longhorn Museum, and two regional parks (Challenger 7 Memorial Park and Walter Hall Park). Additionally, there are 15 City parks, including the 148 acre Clear Creek Nature Center. The City is part of the Great Texas Birding Trail with three birding sites on the Clear Lake Loop. League City has begun efforts to save our State insect, the Monarch Butterfly, and other pollinators by signing the pledge, as well as becoming a Bee City USA affiliate, to encourage our citizens to provide pollinators with a healthy habitat throughout the City.

Community Spotlight

Action Items Committed for Program Year 2021

Communications and Convening

  • Launch or maintain a public communication effort to encourage residents to plant monarch gardens at their homes or in their neighborhoods. (If you have community members who speak a language other than English, we encourage you to also communicate in that language; Champion Pledges must communicate in that language.)
  • Engage with community garden groups and urge them to plant native milkweeds and nectar-producing plants.
  • Engage with city parks and recreation, public works, sustainability, and other relevant staff to identify opportunities to revise and maintain mowing programs and milkweed / native nectar plant planting programs.
  • Engage with gardening leaders and partners (e.g., Master Naturalists, Master Gardeners, Nature Centers, Native Plant Society Chapters , other long-standing and influential community leaders) to support monarch butterfly conservation.
  • Issue a Proclamation to raise awareness about the decline of the monarch butterfly and the species’ need for habitat.

Program and Demonstration Gardens

  • Host or support a native seed or plant sale, giveaway or swap.
  • Plant or maintain a monarch and pollinator-friendly demonstration garden at City Hall or another prominent or culturally significant community location.
  • Plant milkweed and pollinator-friendly native nectar plants in medians and public rights-of-way.
  • Launch or maintain an outdoor education program(s) (e.g., at schools, after-school programs, community centers and groups) that builds awareness and creates habitat by engaging students, educators, and the community in planting native milkweed and pollinator-friendly native nectar plants (i.e., National Wildlife Federation’s Eco-Schools USA Schoolyard Habitats program and Monarch Mission curriculum).
  • Earn or maintain recognition for being a wildlife-friendly city by participating in other wildlife and habitat conservation efforts (i.e., National Wildlife Federation’s Community Wildlife Habitat program).
  • Add or maintain native milkweed and nectar producing plants in community gardens.
  • Host or support a monarch butterfly festival that is accessible to all residents in the community and promotes monarch and pollinator conservation, as well as cultural awareness and recognition.
  • Display educational signage at monarch gardens and pollinator habitat.

Systems Change

  • Change ordinances so herbicides, insecticides, or other chemicals used in the community are not harmful to pollinators.
  • Remove milkweed from the list of noxious plants in city weed / landscaping ordinances (if applicable).
  • Change weed or mowing ordinances to allow for native prairie and plant habitats.
  • Increase the percentage of native plants, shrubs and trees that must be used in city landscaping ordinances and encourage use of milkweed, where appropriate.
  • Direct city property managers to consider the use of native milkweed and nectar plants at city properties where possible.
  • Integrate monarch butterfly conservation into the city’s Park Master Plan, Sustainability Plan, Climate Resiliency Plan or other city plans.
  • Adopt ordinances that support reducing light pollution.